History of Typography: Evolution of Typography in Flyer Advertising Over Time

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The history of typography is a very long one.  Typography traces its origins on the first designs of coins and seals during the ancient times. The basic principle of typography was to use identical characters in creating text for reading. The actual beginning of typography was during the Classical revival of the 15th century in which most of the people revived the ideas, literature, arts and styles of the Greek classical era. This era is now well known as the Renaissance, both in the history of typography and in world history.

During the Renaissance, much of the classical era were put to study and revived. In typography, much of the styles of the old Greeks and Romans were restored and reused into print and writing styles. Since the revival of the classical era, Greek and Roman influences in type design have become evident in most of the prints that were produced during that time. Samples of these typesets or fonts are present on text revivals of from the Latin classics.

One of the most recognizable revivals of typeset during the Renaissance was the Roman type. It has been widely used for several classical revivals during the Renaissance and much of the publishing during the Victorian era.

As time passed, the adopted Roman type has produced different styles, and the existence of its different uses – advertising in particular – has spawned variations and derivations from this type.

Today, typography is still being used the same way it has been the past century – on advertisements, books, signage, etc. Even fonts or typefaces that were used during the Renaissance are still being used by a lot of artists today – the Roman, Italic, Garamond and the serif typesets. With the digitization of almost everything, typography still lives and is continuously flourishing through design.

Most typography styles can be seen on digital or graphic artists’ works. Most of them are used in different experimental ways, sometimes combined with minimalist styles and sometimes used on different post-modern patterns of design. One of the most common print media that usually used or accompanied by typographic design are flyers.  A flyer is one of the most overly used media in graphic design. This promotional tool is used for everything – from product endorsements to event promotions, its use even spans from political to personal. It may not provide a larger working space like posters, but flyers have their own advantage – low cost printing, easy distribution and designing.

In this post, we’ll explore the history of typography by examining the evolution of typography in flyer advertising over time.

Victorian Era

As evident on the most of the typography that were used on the flyers, most of the Renaissance born typefaces are still present and use throughout different advertising paraphernalia. Though the Industrial Revolution has began and many artists has adopted a minimalistic form in advertising – prioritizing function over form – many of the flyers of this era still has influences of Art Nouveau and Victorian style.

 

Flyer Design From 1800s

Flyer Design From 1800s

Flyer Design From 1800s

Flyer Design From 1800s

Flyer Design From 1800s

Flyer Design From 1800s

Flyer Design From 1800s

Early to Late 20th Century
During this time, different art movements was born. There is the continuing Industrial Revolution, which gave birth to modern commercialism, the pop art of andy warhol, minimalism of the 60s, even the aggressive punk music of the late 70s and 80s were influential in the creation of different typefaces (though not widely used in advertising).

 

Flyer from the 1900s

Flyer from the 1900s

Flyer from the 1900s

Flyer from the 1900s

Flyer from the 1900s

Flyer from the 1900s

Flyer from the 1900s

21st century onwards
It was during the present that we saw different styles in using typography for advertising. With a lot of artists drawing inspiration from past art movements, we saw a lot of revivals on minimalism, art nouveau and pop art. Much of the elements of these styles are present in party flyers

 

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